No Silver Bullet

Last week we attended Knowledge Commercialisation Australasia (KCA) 2013 – Investing in the Future. It is quite fitting that my last blog was focused around connectedness being an important aspect of forward planning – as this ended up being an underlying theme of the whole conference. I spent a fair bit of time trying to increase my network within the profession during the conference, and really enjoyed meeting everyone.

Terminology that was used in tSydney he context of successful knowledge transfer included geographical concentration, strategic partnerships, engage, get out more, collaboration, long term relationship, talk to industry, and social innovation.

The knowledge transfer profession is very complex, involving teaching, networking events, consultancy, continuing professional development, collaborative research, contract research, licencing and company creation. The reason being that knowledge comes in many forms, all we are trying to do is increase utilisation of the research outcomes.

It was apparent to me that social benefits across the world are becoming increasingly important for proving the impact of research. As most in the profession are aware not many offices are self sufficient, so proving the wider benefits of such activities are important. There is one vital problem with this, it is hard to measure and all of us know how important KPI’s are. AUTM has started a new campaign called “Put a Face on It”, to market the wider impact of knowledge transfer –check it out here (http://www.autm.net/Put_A_Face_On_IT/11543.htm)

Apparently there are two office models in the US, Technology Licencing and Technology Licencing +, the difference being one is very profitable and the other is 95% of offices in US. Basically the profitable offices purely focus on licensing, because they can. Whereas the others have to try make it work through attempting multiple different ways to increase the number and quality of projects coming through the pipeline.

Even though the use of societal benefit is important, we are never going to be able to shy away from needing to make money. I think one of the key take aways for me was to investigate the potential social, economic and profitable benefits equally – looking towards achieving the greatest impact possible.

If you are interested in learning more about KCA please visit the website http://www.kca.asn.au/. I would especially encourage you to visit the website and check out the KCA scholarship program which supports the travel and registration costs for one lucky KCA member to attend AUTM 2014 Annual Meeting (http://www.autm.net/Meeting_Home2.htm) in San Francisco, California. It is a great opportunity for early career professionals to learn more about Innovation Transfer and expand their networks.

Lisa van den Berg – Commercial  Manager

Creating your Value Proposition / Elevator Pitch

Last week, I attended a great presentation from Damien Edmond at the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI), at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) on “Developing Your Research Proposition”. Inspired by the talk, I thought I would share some further tips on how to effectively communicate the value of your research/ new innovation to your intended audience.

business presentation

Being able to effectively communicate the value proposition of your research/new idea is extremely important, especially when you are seeking investment. However, developing a value proposition can take time and is an iterative process; so here are some tips to help you get started:

1.First consider, who is your audience and what does your audience want/need?

– This is a really important first step and ensures that you remain relevant and engaged with your audience.

2. Who are you, and why should they listen to you (expertise)

– People invest in people. It is important to introduce yourself and communicate your expertise.

3. What is your idea/technology?

– What is it that you have come up with? Explain in simple terms and don’t assume your audience has your depth of knowledge in the area.

4. How could your idea be the basis for a product/service?

– Great, you’ve got an idea. How could this be translated into the community? What does it look like and how will it be used by the end user?

5. Who is your idea helping (end-user)?

– Who is the end-user? Are there multiple end-users?

6. What is the problem that you are going to fix?

– Define the problem you are addressing. Showing focus is important here, even if the idea could potentially solve a number of issues. Choose the problem with the biggest market and/or easiest market entry, and put the other problems that you may be able to solve in the pipeline.

7. How does your idea fix that problem?

– How does your idea or research fix that problem, and how does it special from what others are doing?

Once you are able to clearly answer each of these questions, the trick is trying to communicate it all as succinctly as possible- 30 seconds or less and practice.

Good luck!

Kate Taylor – Commercial Associate

Connectedness and Forward Planning

Forward planning is the key theme of this years Knowledge Commercialisation Australasia (KCA) annual conference – Investing in the Future. As you would of gathered from my blogs to date, I really value the people involved in innovation transfer. Networking and staying connected through LinkedIn is vital to what we do here at bluebox, you can learn a lot from others. Connectedness is a important aspect of forward planning, because in the future your network might contain the one person that can help you with that next step.

connectedness

I certainly encourage all my researchers to get out there and develop a LinkedIn profile, especially if they are interested in working with industry in the future. They are aware of LinkedIn but are often not aware of the potential value to them.

I am really looking forward to KCA 2013, excited about meeting new people and learning from others about Investing in the Future.

If you are interested in learning more about KCA please visit the website http://www.kca.asn.au/. I would especially encourage you to visit the website and check out the KCA scholarship program which supports the travel and registration costs for one lucky KCA member to attend AUTM 2014 Annual Meeting (http://www.autm.net/Meeting_Home2.htm) in San Francisco, California. It is a great opportunity for early career professionals to learn more about Innovation Transfer and expand their networks.

Written by Lisa van den Berg – Commercial Manager